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GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
OriginalGriff18-Oct-22 19:44
mvaOriginalGriff18-Oct-22 19:44 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
bryanren20-Oct-22 4:39
bryanren20-Oct-22 4:39 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Nelek18-Oct-22 23:34
protectorNelek18-Oct-22 23:34 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Richard MacCutchan18-Oct-22 21:00
mveRichard MacCutchan18-Oct-22 21:00 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Sam Hobbs19-Oct-22 9:53
Sam Hobbs19-Oct-22 9:53 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Richard MacCutchan19-Oct-22 21:08
mveRichard MacCutchan19-Oct-22 21:08 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
theoldfool19-Oct-22 0:36
professionaltheoldfool19-Oct-22 0:36 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
trønderen19-Oct-22 3:07
trønderen19-Oct-22 3:07 
Are you referring to the use of these specific words, or are you stating that a language should be static and never change?

In my childhood, the old schoolmaster attitude was common in my country (Norway): The One, True, Correct, Proper way to use the language is as prescribed by a set of definitions in various documents, such as dictionaries.

Over the last fifty years, our attitude has changed from prescriptive to descriptive. If 95% of the speakers of the language uses a construct in an 'improper' way, what is the use of maintaining a rule insisting that they are 'wrong'? Who 'owns' a language - the rule book, or its users? What if 90% break the rule? 70%? 50% and increasing?

At what percentage / time did terrific, in the sense great, become 'proper'? Is its use in the old, proper sense of terrifying now improper use? Another negation: I could care less! has come to mean the same as I couldn't care less! - when did that become proper?

Maybe we should work to reverse all such changes of the language. The question is how far back should we go. Even the English language has changed continuously over the centuries. I have met people who insist, in their Norwegian writing, to use no word that isn't rooted in the pre-1300 Viking Norse language. Actually, almost all from the 'prescriptive' camp can be said to go for a 'descriptive' line, except that the description is of the language two generations back. Certainly not half a generation back, and not four generations, but what the schoolmaster touted as 'proper' when they were grade school kids.

Thirty years ago, Icelandic was one of the 'purest' languages in the Western world: When a new word was about to break into the language, the language program in Icelandic radio announced a competition for a replacement word based on Icelandic traditions. E.g. for 'computer' they took the old word for number, tall, and the word for a mythical truthsayer, volve, and made up the word tölvu, a number-truthsayer, for a computer. To travel is ferðast, so a portable PC is a fartölvu, a travel-number-truthsayer.

Today, Icelandic has more or less given in completely, new words are accepted much more directly. English never even tried to resist change. So I guess any resistance is futile. ("I Got It Bad And That Ain't Good"[^] - composed 81 years ago.)

My own approach is much in harmony with official Norwegian practice: When an imported word comes in widespread use, we make it a 'proper' Norwegian word, but we may adopt a modified Norwegian spelling that harmonizes with our pronunciation rules, and inflected forms are created by Norwegian rules. So some people insist that official Norwegian is 'improper' use, because we e.g. include the plural 's' in the root word: A cap is en caps, and plural caps is capser. Two generations ago, we adopted drops (as in 'fruit drops') and slips (of cloth, tie) as singular forms; today few people are aware that they were originally, and 'properly', plural.

We also accept new meanings of established words, once the new meaning reaches a certain level of usage. Take internet: In my student days, an internet interconnected heterogenous networks of different network protocols and addressing schemes. Nowadays, internet is the homogenous network of a single network protocol and a single addressing scheme. A trailer is the entire truck train, not just the 'real' trail, or even a large truck in a single piece.
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Sam Hobbs19-Oct-22 10:03
Sam Hobbs19-Oct-22 10:03 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Nelviticus19-Oct-22 23:21
Nelviticus19-Oct-22 23:21 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
StatementTerminator20-Oct-22 8:52
StatementTerminator20-Oct-22 8:52 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Sam Hobbs20-Oct-22 9:23
Sam Hobbs20-Oct-22 9:23 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
dandy7219-Oct-22 3:46
dandy7219-Oct-22 3:46 
JokeRe: Have or got Pin
Dan Neely19-Oct-22 3:46
Dan Neely19-Oct-22 3:46 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
rnbergren19-Oct-22 5:25
rnbergren19-Oct-22 5:25 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
trønderen19-Oct-22 7:05
trønderen19-Oct-22 7:05 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Sam Hobbs19-Oct-22 10:07
Sam Hobbs19-Oct-22 10:07 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
DerekT-P19-Oct-22 11:25
professionalDerekT-P19-Oct-22 11:25 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Dr.Walt Fair, PE19-Oct-22 6:46
professionalDr.Walt Fair, PE19-Oct-22 6:46 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Eddy Vluggen19-Oct-22 8:55
professionalEddy Vluggen19-Oct-22 8:55 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Rick York19-Oct-22 10:06
mveRick York19-Oct-22 10:06 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
BillWoodruff19-Oct-22 22:23
professionalBillWoodruff19-Oct-22 22:23 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Steve Naidamast20-Oct-22 5:40
professionalSteve Naidamast20-Oct-22 5:40 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
StatementTerminator20-Oct-22 8:09
StatementTerminator20-Oct-22 8:09 
GeneralRe: Have or got Pin
Shmoken9921-Oct-22 11:58
Shmoken9921-Oct-22 11:58 

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