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GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
Rick York20-Jun-24 18:15
mveRick York20-Jun-24 18:15 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
David O'Neil20-Jun-24 19:01
professionalDavid O'Neil20-Jun-24 19:01 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
Mircea Neacsu21-Jun-24 3:25
Mircea Neacsu21-Jun-24 3:25 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
David O'Neil21-Jun-24 11:32
professionalDavid O'Neil21-Jun-24 11:32 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
PIEBALDconsult21-Jun-24 6:25
mvePIEBALDconsult21-Jun-24 6:25 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
trønderen21-Jun-24 9:13
trønderen21-Jun-24 9:13 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
PIEBALDconsult21-Jun-24 9:38
mvePIEBALDconsult21-Jun-24 9:38 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
trønderen21-Jun-24 11:10
trønderen21-Jun-24 11:10 
You speak like a true USAtian!

I guess that you really are joking. In case you are not: Have you heard about HD Radio? That is the US "Certainly Invented Here" attempt to create a US alternative to the international digital radio standard adopted by Europe, Australia, a lot of Asian countries and a few African ones.

If you read and article where "DAB" comes up, it must be because you are interested in broadcasting, not limited to the US of A (where DAB probably would not come up). In that context, DAB is as fundamental as AM and FM.

Asking "What is DAB" is like if you had asked "What is GSM" at the time when four different "Certainly Invented Here" mobile phone standards where fighting to kill each other in the US. They did, and the NIH GSM system took over. US authorities tried to avoid the same to happen with the three (or was it four?) competing digital FM radio replacements. So before they had all killed each other, FCC declared HD Radio as the winner based on battle points. HD Radio did not have enough going for it to make it an overnight success, and from what I have been told (I haven't visited USA for quite a few years), HD Radio can be described as 'marginalized' in the US radio market of today. So maybe you are not much aware of HDR.

Even though NIH, DAB was considered in the USA, although reluctantly. However, channels at the outer end of the DAB frequency spectrum was so close to frequencies used by US Armed Forces that there was a theoretical possibility that a badly tuned broadcast transmitter could cause interference with military communication. Of course it would have been possible to declare the DAB band to not go that high (in fact, some European countries do!), sacrificing a small fraction of the total capacity. More important: It was a good excuse for rejecting the international standard, replacing it with something Certainly Invented Here.

From a technical point of view, HD Radio is somewhat closer to DRM, rather than DAB. DRM is the primary radio technology in India. If you haven't heard of DAB, I assume that DRM is even more unfamiliar. DRM shares a lot of technological elements with DAB (so making a combined DAB/DRM receiver is quite simple), but some lower layers differ: DAB multiplexes a great number (typically 12-20) of audio channels on a single transmitter, requiring a coordination of the sources or those channels. DRM transmits from a single audio channel up to four, so it is much better suited for an independent 'husband-and-wife'-type radio station. DRM can (re)use an existing FM or AM transmitter. The 'single source' and (to a limited degree) reuse of old transmitters is a trait shared by HDR. But DRM is another NIH international standard, so I guess it is not a viable alternative in the US.

(One trait that HDR does not share: DAB and DRM can extend the coverage by adding transmitters on the same frequency. There is no need to allocate another frequency to a station, no matter how many transmitters it needs to cover its area.)
Religious freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make five.

GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
David O'Neil21-Jun-24 11:30
professionalDavid O'Neil21-Jun-24 11:30 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
trønderen21-Jun-24 13:17
trønderen21-Jun-24 13:17 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
David O'Neil23-Jun-24 14:27
professionalDavid O'Neil23-Jun-24 14:27 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
David O'Neil21-Jun-24 11:11
professionalDavid O'Neil21-Jun-24 11:11 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
RainHat20-Jun-24 21:45
RainHat20-Jun-24 21:45 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
haughtonomous20-Jun-24 23:07
haughtonomous20-Jun-24 23:07 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
trønderen21-Jun-24 9:15
trønderen21-Jun-24 9:15 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
GuyThiebaut20-Jun-24 23:23
professionalGuyThiebaut20-Jun-24 23:23 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
CHill6021-Jun-24 2:34
mveCHill6021-Jun-24 2:34 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
jeron121-Jun-24 5:03
jeron121-Jun-24 5:03 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
jochance21-Jun-24 4:44
jochance21-Jun-24 4:44 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
trønderen21-Jun-24 8:35
trønderen21-Jun-24 8:35 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
Mircea Neacsu21-Jun-24 14:31
Mircea Neacsu21-Jun-24 14:31 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
trønderen21-Jun-24 15:57
trønderen21-Jun-24 15:57 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
Mircea Neacsu21-Jun-24 16:17
Mircea Neacsu21-Jun-24 16:17 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
jmaida21-Jun-24 16:55
jmaida21-Jun-24 16:55 
GeneralRe: Too much verbing? Pin
David O'Neil23-Jun-24 15:39
professionalDavid O'Neil23-Jun-24 15:39 

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